The Apocalyptic Solstice Giveaway

Tomorrow Only
KS-slate-02-lg._V389394900_ copy

This year were giving away 4 different ePUBs as a way of saying thanks to all.

Friday, we’re kicking off with the Apocalpytic Solstice Giveaway on Dec 21st. The book will be A Seat At The Feast (Bk 1).

On Dec 25, we’ll be giving away a Christmas book, A Goose Is Cooked (Bk 2), in our Christmas Reason To Live Giveaway.

On Dec 31, the Fiscal Cliff Dive In A New Year Giveaway book will be Lily Does Sweden.

Plus, we’ll send you as a thank you The Extra Man (Bk 3), if you post a review of one of the giveaway books by Jan 15.

If you’re interested in any or all of these free ePubs, jump over to the giveaway page for the juicy details.

Are you a Giver? US World Book Night Titles Announced

Well folks, that day is finally upon us: the day they announce what books are going to be distributed for World Book Night, US, and the day they start taking applications for bookgivers.

On U.S. World Book Night, 25,000 volunteers sign up to give away 20 copies of one of the available books. Organizers have chosen a diverse list of titles, hoping that each volunteer will be able to walk up to a stranger and say, “I loved this book, I hope you will to.” Volunteers must be 16 or over and can sign up online.

And the winners are . . . .
“Bossypants” by Tina Fey
“City of Thieves” by David Benioff
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” by Mark Twain — Love it.
“Devil in a Blue Dress” by Walter Mosley
“Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
“Favorite American Poems” by various authors
“Girl With a Pearl Earring” by Tracy Chevalier — Love it
“Glaciers” by Alexis M. Smith
“Good Omens” by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
“The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood
“The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros, in English and Spanish editions
“The Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
“The Lightning Thief” by Rick Riordan
“Look Again” by Lisa Scottoline
“Looking for Alaska” by John Green
“Me Talk Pretty One Day” by David Sedaris
“Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life” by James Patterson
“Moneyball” by Michael Lewis
“Montana Sky” by Nora Roberts
“Mudbound” by Hillary Jordan
My Antonia” by Willa Cather .
“The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency” by Alexander McCall Smith
“The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster — Love it.
“Playing for Pizza” by John Grisham
“Population: 485” by Michael Perry
“Salvage the Bones” by Jesmyn Ward
“Still Alice” by Lisa Genova
“The Tender Bar” by J.R. Moehringer
“The Worst Hard Time” by Timothy Egan
“The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho in English and Spanish editions

If you have a love for one or more of these titles, we hope you’ll volunteer to be a giver! We also encourage you to read (or re-read) some of these titles so they can become conversation starters!

Published in: on November 8, 2012 at 4:43 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Austen and Dickens among the hot picks for World Book Night UK — but wait, World Book Night USA is coming soon!

 

If you live outside of the UK, you probably have no idea what WBN is. If that’s you, head on over to the The Bookseller to read Charlotte Williams Oct 11th post on World Book Night.  Or check out WBN’ s website.

Copyright All rights reserved by Macs Butterz “Reading by Moonlight”

What we’re really pleased to say is as of 2012 there will be a  World Book Night USA!!! The celebration of World Book Night US will also be on April 23, 2012. On April 23, 50,000 book givers will hand out 20 copies of one of the 25 World Book Night picks in communities across the U.S. Over the course of the night, a total of a million paperbacks will be given away.

They’ve hired a publishing veteran, Carl Lennertz, as their executive director, and as of this week they have a full board of directors.  You can read more about that on the ABA site.

Unlike in the UK, and probably because this is new, they aren’t opening the nomination of books to the public. Instead,

A bookseller and librarian panel is taking part in several rounds of voting to choose the titles from a list of books derived from 10 years’ worth of Book Sense/Indie Next Reading Group Picks, Barnes & Noble Discover Picks, ALA Best Book Picks, and Pulitzer and National Book Award winners, which have been cross-referenced with several years of ReadingGroupGuides.com’s most requested guides, as well as the Mystery Writers of America all-time top 100, the Goodreads top 100 adult and top 100 YA, and Above the Treeline’s top paperback bestsellers.

The goal is to announce the final list of 25 books for the US WBN (a blend of fiction and nonfiction as well as books for teens and young readers) by December 1. We are hoping something by Thoreau or Muir makes the list given we celebrate Arbor Day and Earth Day around the WBN USA April 23, 2012 date.

WBN USA will also be launching a website soon (That’s a relative term!), which will supposedly have the same book giver registration process as the UK, commencing in December. So, please support reading and printed word, but considering becoming a book giver. When we get the site information, we will pass it along to you.

World Book Night is supported by publishers, Barnes & Noble, the American Booksellers Association, the Association of American Publishers, and Ingram Book Distributors.

 

The full list of 25 titles for UK WBN:

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (Vintage)
The Player of Games by Iain M Banks (Little, Brown)
Sleepyhead by Mark Billingham (Little, Brown)
Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson (Transworld)
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho (HarperCollins)
The Take by Martina Cole (Headline)
Harlequin by Bernard Cornwell (HarperCollins)
Someone Like You by Roald Dahl (Penguin)
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (Penguin)
Room by Emma Donoghue (Pan Macmillan)
Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (Little, Brown)
The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro (Faber)
Misery by Stephen King (Hodder)
The Secret Dreamworld of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella (Transworld)
Small Island by Andrea Levy (Headline)
Let the Right One In by John Ajvde Lindqvist (Quercus)
The Road by Cormac McCarthy (Pan Macmillan)
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger (Vintage)
The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox by Maggie O’Farrell (Headline)
The Damned Utd by David Peace (Faber)
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman (Transworld)
How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff (Penguin)
Touching the Void by Joe Simpson (Vintage)
I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (Vintage)
The Book Thief by Markus Zuzak (Transworld)

Free Book Fridays, with the Nook

Some of you are trying to create an ePub out of your current manuscript. We get that.  If you want to look at how ePubs look through a Nook, you can actually download software to multiple devices, including your PC or Mac, and view the books there.

Barnes & Noble offers a Free Book Friday with Nook.  If you sign up for a Nook account, really just a way to buy books more than a device if you don’t have one, you can start creating a library of free ebooks and books they offer for free on Fridays.  The books will remain in your Nook library perpetually, stored in an archive, if you desire.

Should you buy a Nook, you can use those books in your library on the Nook. However, if you don’t, you can still read your Nook ePub materials on your computer, or other device,  by downloading Nook software — similar to Kindle. To create your account, you will have to give them a credit card, even if the only books you want to collect are free.

The virtue of starting a Nook account and library is that you can use your collection to see how an ePub book is structured. You might be surprised by what you see. Something you’d expect to find in the front of a printed book, such as copyright info, is today typically in the back of many Nook ePubs. Not sure if that shift is to keep readers from thinking about the IP law involved or just a convenient way of cutting down on the front matter.

Anyway, in case you were wondering, we were at Barnes & Noble looking at Nooks today. There are 3 versions, all very interesting with a lot of cool features.  But a major complaint would be no real selection of fonts, and no ability to upload fonts to the Nooks.  This is always disappointing to people who derived a great deal of pleasure from the typography.

The tablet Nook is the largest of the three, holds the most books, runs the longest without recharging, costs the most, orients both horizontally and vertically, which is helpful, and is able to display PDFs.  But it’s very heavy and the battery incredibly strong, by that we mean one can feel the electrical current. Quite scary really.

The tablet version becomes very prickly and hot if one holds it more than a minute. The other Nooks have the same problem, but to a lesser degree. Definitely, if we bought a Nook of any kind, it would have to come with a stand, because honestly no one wants to touch it for fear of getting burned, electrocuted, or developing an inability to use one’s hand because it continues to buzz with excited electric current long after the Nook is put down.

So, would we buy a Nook? Yes, if it were inexpensive enough, say under $100, but it would only be used for testing ePubs on. Nook is a good idea, it has huge potential, but it’s got a long way to go.  We will also say that compared to a Kindle, Nook seems like the better made, more user friendly product.  But if you’re going to the trouble of buying a Nook tablet, why not just buy an iPad?

Published in: on September 21, 2011 at 1:25 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Get your book published, or better yet, get it stolen and then get it published

Ok, as you all know we at FAB don’t go in for certain genres (ie, obscene language as humor), but we know you all have hear of the book we’re going to talk about: the adult “children’s” book Go the …. to Sleep.

What you may not know, and might be encouraged to learn, is that this book was made into a bestseller only because so many people stole it. That’s right, people . . . people who love people . . . were emailing a PDF version of the book around (breaking the copyright) before the book was even released. Google the book and you’ll see the first thing that comes up is a pirate version PDF, not an Amazon link. And the second thing is the Samuel L. Jackson audio reading of the book (also free).

Without copyright infringement, it’s doubtful this book ever would have found major success, and Adam Mansbach admits that in a recent (06/16/11) CNET article by  Rafe Needleman. Every author should read Adam’s comments on piracy  (ditto anyone interested copyright law or publishing).

Adam actually raises a whole host of good points every author should think about.  Such as the benefits of see it free first (in other words, just how you’d see the whole thing if there were still bookstores around), and how larger publishing houses are often the least up on social media, or trends, or even how to use new media effectively. One publisher told Mansbach he need to write a blog “three times a week,” to support his work.

Something that really struck us about the article was Adam’s comment that he wanted to be an author, not an industry.  Most major publishing houses want to turn an author into an industry. Most authors just want to write. If you’re a writer, you should stop and think about this because how you feel about what you do, will probably have a big impact on whether you want to publish with big house or a small press (which will also impact your profits).

As for publishers, or would be publishers, there’s good nuggets in the CNET article for you as well, but we’re reposting this CNN article in addition because we want you to note in the following story of how difficult it sometimes is for a small publisher to manage a huge success (something big houses do well — which is why once JK Rowling’s book caught on, her small publisher took the substantial buy-out by a larger publisher, and let JK and the big pubs take care of business in global fashion).

Go The F@K To Sleep Publisher Gets Big Boost
Book Set For Wide Release

By Dina Santorelli, contributing writer

Posted: 10:08 am CDT June 8, 2011Updated: 10:20 am CDT June 8, 2011

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — Johnny Temple, publisher and founder of Brooklyn-based Akashic Books, likes to say this about independent book publishing:  ”Just keep your doors open for business, and then one day lightning will strike.”

Cue lightning.

Next week, Akashic plans to publish the most irreverent ”children’s” book in recent memory.

Written in the style of a children’s book, ”Go the F to Sleep” unabashingly drops the F-bomb in the text.

The book, written by Adam Mansbach and illustrated by Ricardo Cortés, originally was slated for a fall release. Then the PDF version of the book hit the Internet and went viral. As a result, Akashic is moving up its release date, for both the print book and ebook, to June 14. The film rights already have been sold to Fox 2000.

The popularity of the book has raised the profile of Akashic and is likely to raise its profits.

”Go the F to Sleep” is actually a book for adults that deals with the age-old problem of trying to get children to go to sleep.

”It was very evident to me that the book was addressing with humor what is perhaps the core psychological hurdle of parenthood in the early years,” said Temple, whose own children are ages 3 and 5. ”Lack of sleep breaks up marriages.”

Temple previously worked with Mansbach on an anthology. The author had written other books, which included bestseller ”Angry Black White Boy,” published by Three Rivers Press in 2005.

Mansbach brought the idea to Temple, believing he would be willing to take on the project, despite its controversial title.

”I’ve published some very edgy novels with some big publishers, but I think that’s the exception,” said Mansbach. “Small presses are more willing to take some risks.”

Temple indeed agreed to publish it. Akashic, which publishes 25 to 30 titles per year, was the first — and only — publisher who got a glimpse of the ”Go the F to Sleep” manuscript.

Temple did no promotion for it other than to book sellers and other retail avenues. Not long after, a version of the book appeared on the Internet after an author reading in Philadelphia in late April.

”It was probably accidentally leaked by a bookseller who we had sent a PDF to,” said Temple.

Preorders for the book on Amazon sent it flying up its bestseller’s list. Akashic is one of only a few independent publishers to get a book to hit No. 1 on the e-commerce site.

It would seem that the book going viral would be a detriment to book sales. But the extraordinary success of ”Go the F to Sleep” — whose print edition, at press time, was in its 44th day in Amazon’s Top 100 — perhaps proves that there are plenty of people out there who are willing to pay for the cow even though they could have gotten the milk for free.

Temple takes a rather ambivalent stance on the leak. ”Obviously, if I’m running a business, I want to stay in business,” he said, ”but I believe very strongly in an expansive public domain. We want to allow parents to continue enjoying the book the way they’ve been enjoying it and not really tamper with that too much.”

Originally a rock musician by trade, Temple founded Akashic in 1997 as a ”hobby” with two musician friends (who left the company early on) and an initial investment of $70,000. Since 2002, when Akashic became Temple’s main pursuit, the company has found a well-defined, and well-respected, niche as a place for urban literary fiction. Financially, though, the company has only managed to break even, with annual revenues ranging between $750,000 and $1 million.

Until now.

At press time, the first printing of ”Go the F to Sleep” had been upped to 275,000 copies — by far, Akashic’s biggest to date. The company’s average first print run is between 4,000 and 6,000 copies.

”We could easily be printing up 350,000, but I just want to manage this very carefully,” said Temple, sounding a bit like a guy who has just won the lottery, but is reluctant to quit his day job. ”Once you expand, it’s very hard to contract.”

Temple credits Akashic’s longevity to ”consistently good books, creative low-budget marketing, and careful financial management.”

That being said, he is not about to let a runaway hit derail a management style that has kept his small press’ doors open for the past 14 years.

Independent publishers can actually be hurt by such successes, because they do not have the infrastructure to support the demand, he said.

”We have a sensation and a phenomenon on our hands, but I don’t want to get ahead of myself,” he added. ”I’m being very cautious about what we do with our success and how we manage it.”

Just in case lightning strikes again.

Copyright CNN 2011